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Healthy Habits: Using Behavioral Science in Health Policy

February 13th, 2017|

Encouraging healthy behaviors is a significant policy challenge because efforts to spark conversation around a health topic often fail to translate into strategies that actually change collective health behaviors. Although campaigns might be successful at spreading information, such messages still may not inspire people to act differently. For example, when the National Cancer Institute

A retrospective on Nudgeapalooza 2016

February 2nd, 2017|

From ordering Domino’s Pizza to improving child support compliance, the inaugural Nudgeapalooza conference in Washington, D.C., late last year provided as eclectic of an offering as the name would imply. For one November day, a diverse community of academics, policy makers, and Deloitte consultants gathered to explore some of governments’ toughest issues through the lens

bspa this week (1.31.17)

January 31st, 2017|

behavioral economics isn’t dead yet BloombergView’s Noah Smith argues that, “the people proclaiming the death of behavioral macroeconomics might have been a bit premature. Even if psychology itself doesn’t answer the big economic questions, we may benefit from new macroeconomic theories that assume people are just a little bit irrational.” For insights into some of

bspa this week (1.24.17)

January 24th, 2017|

A Gathering of the Global Elite, Through a Woman’s Eyes The New York Times profiles a day in the life of a “Davos Woman,” Harvard behavioral economist Iris Bohnet, one of the female leaders participating in the 2017 World Economic Forum. Women represent 1 out of 5 of the participants this year. Bohnet’s book What

Can you be nudged to like policies? Possibly yes, if other people like them too…

January 19th, 2017|

What leads people to support or oppose government policies? On some issues people certainly have strong beliefs, sometimes driven by their ideologies or the values they hold. But what about policies people do not have immediate strong feelings about? As Harvard Law Professor Cass R. Sunstein and I show in a recent paper, it turns

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bspa this week (1.17.17)

January 17th, 2017|

Can Behavior Science Help in Flint? The New Yorker’s new profile dives into the work of the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team as the Obama administration comes to a close, and Maya Shankar’s journey to delve deeper into big policy problems -- like the Flint water crisis in Michigan -- after racking

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New Yorker: Can Behavioral Science Help in Flint

January 16th, 2017|

In the latest issue of The New Yorker's Sarah Stillman takes an in-depth look at the Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, including a trip to Flint, Michigan with Maya Shankar, Nate Higgins, and Will Tucker-Ray. The piece explores the team’s accomplishments, their uncertain future, and the push to tackle ever more challenging social issues using

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Nudge Unit Greece: A New Nudge Unit is Starting Up

January 12th, 2017|

  Nudge Unit Greece (NUG) is comprised of professionals who have a solid background in Economics and Psychology. As a team, they combine these two fields in order to bring a fresh perspective in Greek society by starting the NudgeUnitGreece blog, the first blog from Greece with Behavioral Economics (BE) content. It is a matter

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bspa this week (1.10.17)

January 10th, 2017|

Sticking with those New Year’s Resolutions New Year’s is a time for a fresh start, new goals...and lists of behavioral science-backed tips for keeping those personal contracts. Forbes offers 5 New Year's resolutions you can keep (with the help of behavioral science research) from HBS Working Knowledge. Quartz has seven science-backed tips for forming

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bspa this week (1.03.17)

January 3rd, 2017|

Why 2016 was actually one of the best years on record In a Washington Post op-ed, Annie Duflo and Jeffrey Mosenkis from Innovations for Poverty Action argue that 2016 was a great year for “humanity as a whole”. They celebrate four evidence-based lessons learned this year to lift people out of poverty, reduce child

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