Social Psychology

investigates social behavior and individual behavior in a social context, including such topics as aggression, attitudes, attribution theory, group processes, interpersonal processes, prejudice and discrimination, self concept, social cognition, social influence, and stereotypes.

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BSP Articles

  • Making the truth stick & the myths fade: Lessons from cognitive psychology - Summary. Erroneous beliefs are difficult to correct. Worse, popular correction strategies, such as the myth-versus-fact article format, may backfire because they subtly reinforce the myths through repetition and further increase the spread and acceptance of misinformation. Here we identify five key criteria people employ as they evaluate the truth of a statement: They assess general acceptance […]
  • Healthy through habit: Interventions for initiating & maintaining health behavior change - Summary. Interventions to change health behaviors have had limited success to date at establishing enduring healthy lifestyle habits. Despite successfully increasing people’s knowledge and favorable intentions to adopt healthy behaviors, interventions typically induce only short-term behavior changes. Thus, most weight loss is temporary, and stepped-up exercise regimens soon fade. Few health behavior change interventions have been […]
  • Reimagining accountability in K–12 education - Summary. Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in 2002, American policymakers have relied primarily on outcome-based accountability in the form of high-stakes testing to improve public school performance. With NCLB supplanted in 2015 by the Every Student Succeeds Act—which gives states far greater discretion in the design of accountability systems—the time […]
  • Belonging nowhere: Marginalization & radicalization risk among Muslim immigrants - Summary. In the last 15 years, the threat of Muslim violent extremists emerging within Western countries has grown. Terrorist organizations based in the Middle East are recruiting Muslims in the United States and Europe via social media. Yet we know little about the factors that would drive Muslim immigrants in a Western country to heed this […]
  • Blinding prosecutors to defendants’ race: A policy proposal to reduce unconscious bias in the criminal justice system - Summary. Racial minorities are disproportionately imprisoned in the United States. This disparity is unlikely to be due solely to differences in criminal behavior. Behavioral science research has documented that prosecutors harbor unconscious racial biases. These unconscious biases play a role whenever prosecutors exercise their broad discretion, such as in choosing what crimes to charge and when […]
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Resources

Myopic Loss Aversion: A Behavioral Answer to the Equity Premium Puzzle?

By |April 14th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

It’s well known to new and old investors alike that stocks yield much higher returns than bonds and other riskless securities. In fact, in the last 100 years US equities have seen an 8% average

Comments Off on Myopic Loss Aversion: A Behavioral Answer to the Equity Premium Puzzle?

Can Trump resist the power of behavioral science’s dark side

By |February 27th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Jon M Jachimowicz, Columbia University More than two dozen governments, including the U.S., now have a team of behavioral scientists tasked with trying to improve bureaucratic efficiency to “nudge” their citizens toward what they deem

Comments Off on Can Trump resist the power of behavioral science’s dark side

Healthy Habits: Using Behavioral Science in Health Policy

By |February 13th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Encouraging healthy behaviors is a significant policy challenge because efforts to spark conversation around a health topic often fail to translate into strategies that actually change collective health behaviors. Although campaigns might be successful

Comments Off on Healthy Habits: Using Behavioral Science in Health Policy

A retrospective on Nudgeapalooza 2016

By |February 2nd, 2017|Categories: Blog|

From ordering Domino’s Pizza to improving child support compliance, the inaugural Nudgeapalooza conference in Washington, D.C., late last year provided as eclectic of an offering as the name would imply. For one November day,

Comments Off on A retrospective on Nudgeapalooza 2016

bspa this week (1.31.17)

By |January 31st, 2017|Categories: Blog|

behavioral economics isn’t dead yet BloombergView’s Noah Smith argues that, “the people proclaiming the death of behavioral macroeconomics might have been a bit premature. Even if psychology itself doesn’t answer the big economic questions, we

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.31.17)

bspa this week (1.24.17)

By |January 24th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

A Gathering of the Global Elite, Through a Woman’s Eyes The New York Times profiles a day in the life of a “Davos Woman,” Harvard behavioral economist Iris Bohnet, one of the female leaders participating

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.24.17)

Can you be nudged to like policies? Possibly yes, if other people like them too…

By |January 19th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

What leads people to support or oppose government policies? On some issues people certainly have strong beliefs, sometimes driven by their ideologies or the values they hold. But what about policies people do not have

Comments Off on Can you be nudged to like policies? Possibly yes, if other people like them too…

bspa this week (1.17.17)

By |January 17th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Can Behavior Science Help in Flint? The New Yorker’s new profile dives into the work of the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team as the Obama administration comes to a close, and Maya

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.17.17)
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Media

Myopic Loss Aversion: A Behavioral Answer to the Equity Premium Puzzle?

By |April 14th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

It’s well known to new and old investors alike that stocks yield much higher returns than bonds and other riskless securities. In fact, in the last 100 years US equities have seen an 8% average

Comments Off on Myopic Loss Aversion: A Behavioral Answer to the Equity Premium Puzzle?

Can Trump resist the power of behavioral science’s dark side

By |February 27th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Jon M Jachimowicz, Columbia University More than two dozen governments, including the U.S., now have a team of behavioral scientists tasked with trying to improve bureaucratic efficiency to “nudge” their citizens toward what they deem

Comments Off on Can Trump resist the power of behavioral science’s dark side

Healthy Habits: Using Behavioral Science in Health Policy

By |February 13th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Encouraging healthy behaviors is a significant policy challenge because efforts to spark conversation around a health topic often fail to translate into strategies that actually change collective health behaviors. Although campaigns might be successful

Comments Off on Healthy Habits: Using Behavioral Science in Health Policy

A retrospective on Nudgeapalooza 2016

By |February 2nd, 2017|Categories: Blog|

From ordering Domino’s Pizza to improving child support compliance, the inaugural Nudgeapalooza conference in Washington, D.C., late last year provided as eclectic of an offering as the name would imply. For one November day,

Comments Off on A retrospective on Nudgeapalooza 2016

bspa this week (1.31.17)

By |January 31st, 2017|Categories: Blog|

behavioral economics isn’t dead yet BloombergView’s Noah Smith argues that, “the people proclaiming the death of behavioral macroeconomics might have been a bit premature. Even if psychology itself doesn’t answer the big economic questions, we

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.31.17)

bspa this week (1.24.17)

By |January 24th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

A Gathering of the Global Elite, Through a Woman’s Eyes The New York Times profiles a day in the life of a “Davos Woman,” Harvard behavioral economist Iris Bohnet, one of the female leaders participating

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.24.17)

Can you be nudged to like policies? Possibly yes, if other people like them too…

By |January 19th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

What leads people to support or oppose government policies? On some issues people certainly have strong beliefs, sometimes driven by their ideologies or the values they hold. But what about policies people do not have

Comments Off on Can you be nudged to like policies? Possibly yes, if other people like them too…

bspa this week (1.17.17)

By |January 17th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Can Behavior Science Help in Flint? The New Yorker’s new profile dives into the work of the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team as the Obama administration comes to a close, and Maya

Comments Off on bspa this week (1.17.17)
Load More Posts